Case Studies

We've provided a number of case studies relevant to the developing technology and implementation of the Aeromedical field below. As the field continues to evolve, we'll do our best to add new content as it becomes available.

Case Study

With an increase in contigency operations in the NATO theater of operations, the Theater Aeromedical Evacuation System (TAES) needs to be flexible to meet the ever-changing demands of both combat and military operations other than war. Recent evolution in United States medical evacuation policies have made it neccesary for the TAES to also change the way it does business. This paper discusses the composition of the TAES, recent additions to the TAES, trends in US medical policies, and implementation of the TAES during Operation JOINT ENDEAVOR/GUARD.

Case Study

The aim of this agreement is to standardize the terminology, procedures, training and equipment used in the aeromedical evacuation of sick and wounded personnel, in order to facilitate the transport of patients of one NATO nation in the aircraft of any other NATO nation.

Case Study

The cornerstone of the current concept of military medical operations is the function, fit, and form of the provision of enroute care. The life-saving capability of far-forward surgery creates the need for a new and unique ability: to move stabilized, but not necessarily stable, patients. The current system of en route care serves as a primary and indispensable portion of the continuum of critical care. Without the capability of moving patients, the ability to do far forward surgery would be meaningless.

Case Study

NATO Strategy changed with the end of the cold war. In this context, medical support during operations must correspond to the mobility and flexibility of the units to be supported. Aeromedical Evacuation (AE) is usually the fastest and in many cases the only life-saving mode of transportation in the Evacuation Chain. In the forward area AE rotary wing platforms have long been the normal. Fixed wing platforms are used for Intra- (Tactical) and Inter-(Strategic) AE in correspondence to STANAG 3204. Its importance is driven by factors, which include adequate trauma care, the distance from home country to the mission area, the dispersed nature of NATO forces in the Area of Operations, the lack of useful host nation support, austere environment and the lethality of modern weapons. The factors above have triggered an increase in the movement of less stable casualties over long distances.

Therefore sufficient and qualified AE capacities as well as trained and experienced medical personnel at and between all levels of medical care are a prerequisite for the fast, competent and, if indicated, intensively medically monitored transportation of critically sick or wounded patients to treatment facilities that provide definitive and final specific casualty and medical care (rehabilitation).

Today, air rescue and AE constitute an indispensable integral part of modern medical support.